How To Connect a Computer To Your TV

-Updated 2/24/2009

Overview

Many people already know that you can connect a computer to a plasma TV, but it is not as well known that you can also hook up a computer to almost any TV. The process may not be as easy and the picture not as sharp as a plasma TV or other newer kind of TV, but you may be surprised at the results that can be achieved with your existing television.

There are numerous benefits and reasons why you would want to connect your computer to your TV. You can check a players' statistics online while watching a sporting event, use your favorite music program to play your favorite tunes, show all of your digital photos or videos to your family, and even show a PowerPoint presentation to coworkers. Combining the computer with your home theater allows possibilities for the easy chair, that were once limited to the office chair.

Making the Connection

Setting up a computer in your home theater is not generally as hard as some think. To get started, you need to be able to make a compatible connection from your computer to your TV. In the simplest case, your connection from the computer should match the connection on your TV. For example, if your TV has a VGA input and your computer has a VGA output, you need just a cable to connect both together. If there isn't a match of video inputs to outputs, it might still be possible to make a connection, but more about that later.

Let's start with the computer connection first. Examine the back of your computer for available monitor connections. Depending on your computer's graphic capabilities, you should be able to identify one or more of the following: a 15-pin VGA output, a DVI connection, or an S-Video output. Your computer could support one, two, or all of the connections listed. If you are unsure, refer to the video section of your computer's user manual.

Next, you will need to identify the type of television you have. It will be either an analog or digital TV. If you own an analog television, look for an S-Video input. If you own a digital television, look for an S-Video, 15-pin VGA, component video, or DVI input. Many of the newer televisions, such as Plasma, DLP, or LCD, should have a PC compatible 15-pin VGA input.

Finally, we need to find a matching connection between the two. If you have a VGA or DVI match, use that for the best image quality and performance. If you have a component connection on your TV and a VGA output on your computer, choose those connections. Use S-Video as a last resort if you have no other choice, or are not as concerned about the video quality of your connection.

Before you begin, download and install the latest drivers for your computers video card. The newest software has options for making this project easier than it used to be. The most common graphics cards are the following:

  • Cards based on the nVIDIA platform. Drivers are available at nVIDIA.com
  • Cards based on the ATI platform. Drivers available at ATI.com
  • Cards based on the Intel Extreme Graphics platform. Drivers available at Intel.com

Always refer to your computer or video card manufacturer's website or before installing any software. Sometimes, drivers are available there. Do not download drivers for a graphics chip different from what your computer uses.

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Connecting With S-Video

To make this connection, you will need the following:

  • A computer with a S-Video output, or a VGA to S-Video adaptor
  • A TV with a S-Video input
  • A S-video cable
  • A 1/8" to Left/Right RCA cable (for sound)
  • A computer monitor (for setup purposes if needed)

If you do not have what's listed above, this kind of connection will not work. Some computers require a separate adapter to use the S-Video capability of your graphics card. In many cases, the adapter will need to be plugged in prior to making adjustments to the output settings of your graphics card.

If your computer only has a VGA output, you can still connect with S-video by purchasing a VGA to S-video adaptor, like the Kworld PC to TV signal converter. Using one of these greatly simplifies the setup process, and is virtually plug and play.

Kworld PC to TV adaptor

Connecting with S-Video is the easiest connection to make from your computer. Though it is the only, and best, choice for analog TVs, S-video will yield the least desirable image quality on digital or high definition capable displays. The S-video connection will not yield computer quality image results.

If you cannot bring a computer monitor near your TV, and are not using a VGA to S-Video adaptor, you will need to perform step 4 & 5 from a remote location before you attempt to hook up the computer to your TV.

Connecting With Your Computer's S-Video Jack:

 

 

 

 

  1. Connect the S-Video cable from the back of the computer to an S-Video input on the back of your television. Hookup the computer to the computer monitor at the same time. Connect the 1/8" to L/R RCA cable from the audio output on your computer to the corresponding audio jacks on your TV.
  2. Change the input on your television to the S-Video input you plugged the computer in to.
  3. Using your computer monitor. Access the graphics card setup menu. You can usually access these menus by right clicking on the desktop, click on properties, select the settings tab, and then click on advanced. The software for every graphics card will be different.
  4. Locate the menu tab for engaging or disengaging the S-Video output, or a wizard for setting up your graphics adapter with a television. Once you turn it on, an image will appear on the TV screen. If there is a selection to make it your primary monitor, do so. On many notebook computers, there is often a keyboard shortcut to do this, such as Fn+F8.
  5. The image on the screen has a relationship with your resolution settings. Although all S-Video outputs use a fixed low resolution to maintain compatibility with your TV, it scales according to what the resolution of your computer is set to. Adjust your resolution in the settings tab of your display properties. Use a selection no higher than 800 x 600 with 16-bit color. A setting of 640 x 480 will be much clearer, but icons and windows will appear very large.

Once complete, you can disconnect your computer monitor. When you boot-up your computer, the S-video connection should be enabled. In some cases, the S-video output needs to be enabled on a per session basis. If your software reflects this, leave the computer in a stand-by or hibernation mode when not in use. Your current settings will remain intact until the next time your computer is shut down.

Connecting With a VGA to S-Video Adaptor:

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Before connecting your PC to the VGA adaptor, check to make sure that your display resolution output settings are within the capable range of the adaptor. Most VGA to S-Video adaptors are not capable of scaling resolutions beyond 1280 X 1024. Connect the 1/8" to L/R RCA cable from the audio output on your computer to the corresponding audio jacks on your TV.
  2. Connect the VGA cable to the back of the PC, and the other end to the VGA input on the adaptor.
  3. Connect the S-Video Cable to the S-Video jack on the adaptor, and the other end to the television's S-Video input.
  4. Change the input on your television to the S-Video input you plugged the S-Video cable in to.
  5. Turn on the computer. You should get an image on your TV. If you do not get an image on your TV, double check your wiring, input selection, and resolution settings using a PC monitor. Also, double check to make sure your adaptor is plugged in, and receiving power.
  6. The image on the screen has a relationship with your resolution settings. Although all S-Video outputs use a fixed low resolution to maintain compatibility with your TV, it scales according to whatever the resolution of your computer is set at. Adjust your resolution in the settings tab of your display properties. Use a selection no higher than 800 x 600 with 16-bit color. A setting of 640 x 480 will be much clearer, but icons and windows will appear very large. Your adaptor may also offer additional adjustments and features. Refer to your adaptor's user manual.

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Connecting with VGA/DVI

You can make a connection with DVI by following the same basic steps below. Substitute a DVI cable in place of the 15-pin VGA cable. If you are attempting to connect your computer's VGA output to an S-video connection, refer to Page 2 - Connecting with S-Video.

To make a connection with a 15-pin VGA cable, you will need the following:

A 15-pin VGA output on your computer (All PC's should have this)

  • A 15-pin VGA input on your television
  • A 15-pin VGA cable
  • A 1/8" to Left/Right RCA cable
  • A computer monitor (for setup, if needed)

Some (though rare) televisions may include a 5 wire RGB input (R, G, B, H, V) or 3 wire RGB (RGB with syncs on green). Do not mistake a 3 wire RGB input for component video. You can use this input to make a connection. However, you will need to obtain a 15-pin VGA to 5 or 3-wire RGB cable.

If you've identified a 15-pin VGA input on your television, you will need to do a little hunting in your television's display manual for compatible display and signal formats. 15-pin inputs on a TV could support RGB, component video, or both. In order to use it with a PC VGA output, it must be RGB compatible.

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Compatible resolutions could be listed as resolutions or as letters; a chart is below to explain them. If your input is PC compatible, it will say one or more of the following:

  • VGA = 640x480
  • SVGA = 800x600
  • XGA = 1024x768
  • SXGA = 1280x1024
  • UXGA = 1600x1200
  • WVGA= 858x480
  • WSVGA = 1280x768 or 1280x800
  • WUXGA = 1920x1080 or 1920x1200

Your 15-pin input might not be directly PC compatible. If this is the case it will say one or a few of the following television formats. The compatible PC resolution is listed next to it.

  • 480i - not compatible with most PC graphic adapters
  • 480p - 720x480
  • 720p - 1280x720
  • 1080i - 1920x1080 (interlaced)
  • 1080p - 1920x1080

If your input does not list any computer formats, only television formats, it's okay! We can still get this to work.

If you're hooking up a Plasma, DLP, or LCD television you should be able to plug it in and turn it on. However, if you do this and get no picture, use a separate computer monitor to adjust settings before plugging the cable into the TV.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Change the TV input to the appropriate selection to engage the 15-pin VGA input.
  2. Connect the VGA cable from the back of the computer to the computer monitor.
  3. Turn on the computer. An image should appear on your PC screen.
  4. Right click on the desktop and select properties. Click on the tab that says settings. If your television is PC compatible, go to step 5. If your TV is not compatible go to step 6.
  5. If your TV is PC compatible, move the resolution slider to a compatible selection. 1024x768 is a common choice, but today's newer 720p and 1080p flat panels should support their PC signals in their native resolutions. Make your choice and hit apply. Go to step 7. Some TV's (particularly older sets) are only compatible at 640x480 or 800x600. If so, it may not be listed on the slider. Hit advanced, and select the adapter tab. Press "list all modes" and select 640x480, High Color (16 bit), 60 Hertz from the list of valid modes. Click "yes" when it asks you to keep this setting.
  6. If your TV is not PC compatible, you will need to select a format that is compatible with your TV. Within the settings tab, click on advanced. Go to the adapter tab and select "list all modes." Select 720x480, High Color (16 bit), 60 Hertz from the list. Click "yes" if it asks you to keep this setting. Go to step 7.
  7. Unplug the cable from the back of the monitor and plug it in to the TV. If you made the proper selections, you should have an image on your TV screen. If your TV was PC compatible, you do not need to take any additional steps. Connect the 1/8" to L/R RCA cable from the audio output on your computer to the corresponding audio jacks on your TV.
  8. If your TV was not PC compatible, you should have an image on the screen. It's likely that the icons are very big. Using the chart above and the "list all modes" selection, you can try to find different resolutions that are compatible with your TV. When selecting resolution, the screen will blank out. If the image does not return, you found an incompatible display format. Do nothing and it should switch back to the last setting after 15 seconds. TIP: you can make more choices appear under "list all modes" by going to the monitor tab and deselecting the box that says "Hide modes that this monitor can't display."

Once complete, you can remove the computer monitor. You will be able to shut down the computer when not in use, or use the stand by and hibernation modes. The computer will keep your current settings unless you physically change them, or install new drivers for your graphics card.

If you're having trouble finding a compatible resolution using the Windows Display Manager, check for additional software from the graphics chip maker that may offer more control options. From the Display properties settings screen, click advanced, then check the tabs at the top for additonal software from ATI, nVidia, or Intel depending on the graphics chip manufacturer. For example, here's a screenshot of the nVidia Control Panel.

<< Page 2: Connecting With S-Video | Page 4: Connecting With Component Video >>

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Connecting With Component Video

To make this connection possible, you must have the following:

  • A digital TV with a component video input
  • A 15-pin VGA output on your computer
  • A high resolution capable VGA to component video transcoder or bundled component video accessory cable (A transcoder is a device that transforms RGB signals into component video signals)
  • A 15-pin VGA cable
  • A component video cable
  • A 1/8" to L/R RCA cable
  • A computer monitor (for setup)

If you have a computer with a component video capable graphics card, you may have received a component video cable in the box. If so, you do not need a VGA transcoder (skip to Section 2). If you didn't receive a cable in the box, but know that your graphics card supports component video output, your card maker may sell the necessary cable or kit to hook up your computer to an HDTV set separately. This will be significantly less expensive than buying a transcoder, and also more flexible and with better quality. Look for an alternate (typically round) connector next to the standard VGA or DVI output. If you see one, refer to your owners guide or card maker's website for details on what it is capable of outputting.

If your card is not component video capable, you will need to purchase a high resolution capable VGA to component video transcoder or replace the graphics board with one that is component video capable (recommended).

Avoiding the "VGA to Component Video Cable"

Many online discount stores sell an accessory cable that looks like it will connect a VGA input to a component video input. It's nothing more than a cable, and is often priced under $20. It's important to note that this type of accessory cable will not allow you to connect a computer to a TVs component video input unless the TV's component input is also RGB capable. Since there are few consumer grade TVs ever produced with this ability, this cable will not work for the majority of users.

"Why not?" you ask. Well, even though this accessory cable will allow you to match the physical connections for your VGA output and component video input, there's a significant difference in the signal format. Computers output RGB+HV signals, which is not the same as component video. This accessory cable ends up delivering RGB with syncs on green to the connected display, which nearly all televisions will not accept. I know, the connectors look like component video... but it's not. 

So what is this cable for? This cable is most often used to connect component video sources (like a DVD player) to a digital projector. These projectors often sport VGA (DB-15) inputs that support both RGB and component video signals.

Section 1: Connecting with a Component Video Transcoder

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Change the TV input to the appropriate selection to engage the component video input.
  2. Hookup the VGA cable from the back of the computer to the computer monitor.
  3. Turn on the computer. An image should appear on your PC screen.
  4. Right click on the desktop and select properties. Click on the 'Settings' tab.
  5. Identify the compatible scan formats for your component video input. The possible formats are usually 480p, 720p, and 1080i. It is common to find that many CRT based TVs, such as direct-view tubes and CRT rear-projection displays, don't support 720p.
  6. Since the component video input on your TV is not PC compatible, you will need to select a format that is compatible with your TV. Within the settings tab, click on advanced. Go to the adapter tab and select "list all modes." Select 720x480, 1280x720, or 1920 x 1080 (interlaced), High Color (16 bit), 60 Hertz from the list. Click "yes" if it asks you to keep this setting. NOTE: 1920x1080 (interlaced) is a very high resolution, which will make desktop items and text difficult to see.
  7. Unplug the computer from the back of the monitor and plug it in to the transcoder. Hook up the component video cables from the transcoder to the component video input on the back of your TV. If you chose a compatible selection, you should have an image on your TV screen. Connect the 1/8" to L/R RCA cable from the audio output on your computer to the corresponding audio jacks on your TV.
  8. Depending on the display format chosen, you might want to try different choices to maximize image quality. In the "list all modes" selection, you can try to find different resolutions that are compatible with your TV. When selecting resolution, the screen will blank out. If the image does not return, you found an incompatible display format. Do nothing and it should switch back to the last setting after 15 seconds. TIP: you can make more choices appear under "list all modes" by going to the monitor tab and deselecting the box that says "Hide modes that this monitor can't display."

Section 2: Connecting with a bundled component video accessory cable

If you have an accessory cable, your card maker will have simpler methods of making an HDTV connection (compared to the Windows Display Manager) in their latest software driver packages. Before you begin, I highly recommend locating and installing the latest drivers for your graphics card.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Change the TV input to the appropriate selection to engage the component video input.
  2. Hookup the accessory cable to the back of the computer, and the other end to the TV. Connect a regular computer monitor to the VGA or DVI output temporarily.
  3. Turn on the computer. An image should appear on your PC screen.
  4. Right click on the desktop and select properties. Click on the 'Settings' tab.
  5. Locate the graphics card managment software provided by your card maker. Sometimes it's an icon in the task tray, sometimes it's a tab in the 'advanced' area of the display manager.
  6. Identify the compatible scan formats for your component video input. The possible formats are usually 480p, 720p, 1080i, and 1080p. It is common to find that many CRT based TVs, such as direct-view tubes and CRT rear-projection displays, don't support 720p or 1080p.
  7. Since the component video input on your TV is not PC compatible, you will need to select a format that is compatible with your TV. In the graphics card manager, locate the area for managing displays, and look for an option to "connect to TV" or "Connect to HDTV". You should see a checkbox for enabling the component video output or a wizard for setting up your graphics card to connect to a TV, and should also find a variety of options to select the type and/or resolution of the display. Choose the best format compatible with your television. If you're not sure, try the different modes until you find one that looks best.
  8. Unplug the computer from the back of the regular monitor. Connect the 1/8" to L/R RCA cable from the audio output on your computer to the corresponding audio jacks on your TV.

Once your component video connection is complete and working, you should not need the regular computer monitor. You should be able to shut down the computer when not in use, or use the stand by and hibernation modes. The computer will keep your current settings unless you physically change them or install new drivers for your graphics card.

<< Page 3: Connecting With VGA/DVI | Comment on this article

Comments

Here's an article on how to connect your computer to your TV using VGA and audio: http://gainedknowledge.blogspot.com/2008/09/connect-your-computer-to-you...

Wow, I just wanted this information badly. In fact, I have a digital TV here at home and was looking for ways to connect the computer to it. So indepth information, thanks Tech lore.

Lenin Nair
http://cutewriting.blogspot.com

I have a Dell D600 with a 15 pin video out. I have a new Sharp flat screen with a Green,Red and Blue input. I bought a 15pin with the 3, G,R,B, cables. I put the TV's input on the component setting. Nothing but black screen.
Is there a 15pin with the standard yellow video cable?
This should not be this hard.

wsoxman said:
I have a Dell D600 with a 15 pin video out. I have a new Sharp flat screen with a Green,Red and Blue input. I bought a 15pin with the 3, G,R,B, cables. I put the TV's input on the component setting. Nothing but black screen.
Is there a 15pin with the standard yellow video cable?
This should not be this hard.

There are threads where this adapter is discussed, and for most consumer grade TVs, it simply won't work. The signals are simply different. 

Component video inputs on most TVs sport red, green, and blue connectors, but that's not the same as an RGB input. Component video looks for luminance and two chrominance signals: red difference, and blue difference. RGB signals are comprised of 5 different parts: Red drive, Blue drive, Green drive, and horizontal and vertical syncs. RGB outputs are typically 5 wires, sporting a cable for each part.

The adapter you bought is for certain monitors that support RGB over three cables, putting the syncs on the green drive cable. You don't find this connection used on consumer televisions, shy of a few rare models I've seen with RGB inputs over the years. In other words, you need a different device to make that connection to a component video input that converts RGB to component signals. It's talked about in the article on page 4 of the article.

some guy said:
What if your computer has a vga port and the tv has a dvi port?

Most DVI ports on digital TVs are DVI-I ports, meaning it supports both digital and analog connections. In most cases, the DVI port will support computer output signals, but you'll need to refer to your TVs owner's manual to be sure.

If it does support PC connections, then you'll need a VGA to DVI adapter, which can be bought online or in some stores. They're not that expensive.

Matt Whitlock said:

some guy said: What if your computer has a vga port and the tv has a dvi port?

Most DVI ports on digital TVs are DVI-I ports, meaning it supports both digital and analog connections. In most cases, the DVI port will support computer output signals, but you'll need to refer to your TVs owner's manual to be sure. If it does support PC connections, then you'll need a VGA to DVI adapter, which can be bought online or in some stores. They're not that expensive.

I got my laptop finally working right with my HDTV. I just use a S-video. The key here is to go into properties, setup, click on display which should show your tv. Click High Color

Then make SURE you click on the EXTEND my windows monitor. Click Apply.

All you might get it a view of your desktop. KEY Open what you want to view and Slide it to the right until it appears on your TV.  I have audio cable going into my TV with just a single in the laptop and Red and White in the TV.

wsoxman said:

Matt Whitlock said:

some guy said: What if your computer has a vga port and the tv has a dvi port?

Most DVI ports on digital TVs are DVI-I ports, meaning it supports both digital and analog connections. In most cases, the DVI port will support computer output signals, but you'll need to refer to your TVs owner's manual to be sure. If it does support PC connections, then you'll need a VGA to DVI adapter, which can be bought online or in some stores. They're not that expensive.

I got my laptop finally working right with my HDTV. I just use a S-video. The key here is to go into properties, setup, click on display which should show your tv. Click High Color
Then make SURE you click on the EXTEND my windows monitor. Click Apply.
All you might get it a view of your desktop. KEY Open what you want to view and Slide it to the right until it appears on your TV.  I have audio cable going into my TV with just a single in the laptop and Red and White in the TV.

Using S-Video is certainly a possible solution, but if you have an HDTV, it can be beneficial to make it work with VGA, DVI, Component, or HDMI to take advantage of higher resolutions (better photo and video playback). S-Video is limited to 480i, scaled from whatever the desktop resolution is. If your desktop is set to anything higher than 800x600, text is pretty much illegible. 

Still, if S-video is working good for you, then rock on!

i have a pc with a vga output and a 4 pin s-video output on the gigabite graffix
card. i want to see the picture on my pc monitor and on a old tv monitor with rca input. (no audio needed) i have the next cables
- s-video to 1 rca
- s-video to 2 rca
how do i do it?. and what cable?. (maybe computer settings?)

michaelbr said:
i have a pc with a vga output and a 4 pin s-video output on the gigabite graffix
card. i want to see the picture on my pc monitor and on a old tv monitor with rca input. (no audio needed) i have the next cables
- s-video to 1 rca
- s-video to 2 rca
how do i do it?. and what cable?. (maybe computer settings?)

You'll need the S-video to single RCA male plug (which, just as an FYI, will degrade the image a bit).

Make sure you've gotten the latest drivers for your card installed (you didn't specify if it was an nVidia or ATI based card), then you should find the option to enable the TV out in the config settings for the card. The drivers usually install a control panel with all those configuration settings.

Good luck!

Hi, Thank you so much for your help! I just wanted to clarify one thing with you.

I just bought a new HDTV (LG-26LG30),and want to make sure I don't mess this up.
I'm looking at the specifications for my TV and it lists:
PC Audio Input and
RGP In (D-Sub 15)-PC

My laptop (HP-Pav dv2988 nr) has a VGA port.

If I just get a VGA-VGA cable, will my sound transfer over to my TV? Or do I need to get something else to put in the PC Audio Input port on the TV?

And for the VGA-VGA cable, would this one be ok to use?:
http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=102&cp_id=10201&cs_id...

I would appreciate any help you can give me. Thank you!!

I have a laptop with a VGA output and also an S-Video output, but my new TV has only HDMI Inputs and component video inputs. How can I get this to work??

narzel said:
Hi, Thank you so much for your help! I just wanted to clarify one thing with you.
I just bought a new HDTV (LG-26LG30),and want to make sure I don't mess this up.
I'm looking at the specifications for my TV and it lists:
PC Audio Input and
RGP In (D-Sub 15)-PC
My laptop (HP-Pav dv2988 nr) has a VGA port.
If I just get a VGA-VGA cable, will my sound transfer over to my TV? Or do I need to get something else to put in the PC Audio Input port on the TV?
And for the VGA-VGA cable, would this one be ok to use?:
http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=102&cp_id=10201&cs_id=1020...
I would appreciate any help you can give me. Thank you!!

The monoprice cable looks like it will do the job just fine provided the TV and port on your laptop are female (which they should be, so I'd say you're fine there). 

VGA cables don't carry audio. As listed in the setup for every type of connection in the article, you'll also need a 1/8" male to 1/8" male stereo plug (if the PC audio input on the TV looks like a headphone jack) or a 1/8" stereo to stereo RCA plug cable (if the PC audio input on the TV is your typical L/R audio jack found on most gear). The cable plugs into your laptop's headphone jack and the PC audio input on the TV.

LimoGuy said:
I have a laptop with a VGA output and also an S-Video output, but my new TV has only HDMI Inputs and component video inputs. How can I get this to work??

I'm currently researching options for getting PCs pluged into HDMI jacks, but I haven't found one that really works well yet (unless the laptop sports an HDMI output, but not many do right now).

Hello, Trying to hook up Mitsubishi WS-55805 tv to pc with db15 cable male to male (looks like VGA but has 2 rows instead of 3) Not sure what to do. can't get desktop to show on TV. Thanks before hand. I was thinking maybe the drivers are not installed for db15 pci in the computer but just not sure. Please help

dtslammer said:
Hello, Trying to hook up Mitsubishi WS-55805 tv to pc with db15 cable male to male (looks like VGA but has 2 rows instead of 3) Not sure what to do. can't get desktop to show on TV. Thanks before hand. I was thinking maybe the drivers are not installed for db15 pci in the computer but just not sure. Please help

db15 is a serial control cable, not a video output. If memory serves me right, on the WS-55805 there is a db15 com port near the HD input. This was a control port for their matching (mega expensive) DTV tuner at the time, the Mitsubishi HD 1080.

The good news for you, though, is that TV's HD input is both 5 wire RGB and component video selectable in the menu. If you pick up a VGA to five wire RGB cable, you should be able to adjust the timings in your PC to output a compatible resolution of 480p or 1080i.

Your a "LifeSaver" Matt. Now for a tech-dummy like me can you post a picture directions for timing? As well, I have comcast HD DVR which uses the RGBs. Is there someting else I can do? If you need to see manual you can find it here with free membership
http://tv.manualsonline.com/manuals/mfg/mitsubishi/mitsubishi_diamond_se...
my tv uses this manual. Thanks before hand

i have a pc with a vga output and a 4 pin s-video output on the gigabite graffix
card. i want to see the picture on my pc monitor and on a old tv monitor with rca input. (no audio needed) i have the next cables
- s-video to 1 rca
- s-video to 2 rca
how do i do it?. and what cable?. (maybe computer settings?)

michaelbr said:
i have a pc with a vga output and a 4 pin s-video output on the gigabite graffix
card. i want to see the picture on my pc monitor and on a old tv monitor with rca input. (no audio needed) i have the next cables
- s-video to 1 rca
- s-video to 2 rca
how do i do it?. and what cable?. (maybe computer settings?)

You'll need the S-video to single RCA male plug (which, just as an FYI, will degrade the image a bit).

Make sure you've gotten the latest drivers for your card installed (you didn't specify if it was an nVidia or ATI based card), then you should find the option to enable the TV out in the config settings for the card. The drivers usually install a control panel with all those configuration settings.

Good luck!

Hi, Thank you so much for your help! I just wanted to clarify one thing with you.

I just bought a new HDTV (LG-26LG30),and want to make sure I don't mess this up.
I'm looking at the specifications for my TV and it lists:
PC Audio Input and
RGP In (D-Sub 15)-PC

My laptop (HP-Pav dv2988 nr) has a VGA port.

If I just get a VGA-VGA cable, will my sound transfer over to my TV? Or do I need to get something else to put in the PC Audio Input port on the TV?

And for the VGA-VGA cable, would this one be ok to use?:
http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=102&cp_id=10201&cs_id...

I would appreciate any help you can give me. Thank you!!

I have a laptop with a VGA output and also an S-Video output, but my new TV has only HDMI Inputs and component video inputs. How can I get this to work??

narzel said:
Hi, Thank you so much for your help! I just wanted to clarify one thing with you.
I just bought a new HDTV (LG-26LG30),and want to make sure I don't mess this up.
I'm looking at the specifications for my TV and it lists:
PC Audio Input and
RGP In (D-Sub 15)-PC
My laptop (HP-Pav dv2988 nr) has a VGA port.
If I just get a VGA-VGA cable, will my sound transfer over to my TV? Or do I need to get something else to put in the PC Audio Input port on the TV?
And for the VGA-VGA cable, would this one be ok to use?:
http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=102&cp_id=10201&cs_id=1020...
I would appreciate any help you can give me. Thank you!!

The monoprice cable looks like it will do the job just fine provided the TV and port on your laptop are female (which they should be, so I'd say you're fine there). 

VGA cables don't carry audio. As listed in the setup for every type of connection in the article, you'll also need a 1/8" male to 1/8" male stereo plug (if the PC audio input on the TV looks like a headphone jack) or a 1/8" stereo to stereo RCA plug cable (if the PC audio input on the TV is your typical L/R audio jack found on most gear). The cable plugs into your laptop's headphone jack and the PC audio input on the TV.

LimoGuy said:
I have a laptop with a VGA output and also an S-Video output, but my new TV has only HDMI Inputs and component video inputs. How can I get this to work??

I'm currently researching options for getting PCs pluged into HDMI jacks, but I haven't found one that really works well yet (unless the laptop sports an HDMI output, but not many do right now).

Hello, Trying to hook up Mitsubishi WS-55805 tv to pc with db15 cable male to male (looks like VGA but has 2 rows instead of 3) Not sure what to do. can't get desktop to show on TV. Thanks before hand. I was thinking maybe the drivers are not installed for db15 pci in the computer but just not sure. Please help

dtslammer said:
Hello, Trying to hook up Mitsubishi WS-55805 tv to pc with db15 cable male to male (looks like VGA but has 2 rows instead of 3) Not sure what to do. can't get desktop to show on TV. Thanks before hand. I was thinking maybe the drivers are not installed for db15 pci in the computer but just not sure. Please help

db15 is a serial control cable, not a video output. If memory serves me right, on the WS-55805 there is a db15 com port near the HD input. This was a control port for their matching (mega expensive) DTV tuner at the time, the Mitsubishi HD 1080.

The good news for you, though, is that TV's HD input is both 5 wire RGB and component video selectable in the menu. If you pick up a VGA to five wire RGB cable, you should be able to adjust the timings in your PC to output a compatible resolution of 480p or 1080i.

Your a "LifeSaver" Matt. Now for a tech-dummy like me can you post a picture directions for timing? As well, I have comcast HD DVR which uses the RGBs. Is there someting else I can do? If you need to see manual you can find it here with free membership
http://tv.manualsonline.com/manuals/mfg/mitsubishi/mitsubishi_diamond_se...
my tv uses this manual. Thanks before hand

dtslammer said:
Your a "LifeSaver" Matt. Now for a tech-dummy like me can you post a picture directions for timing? As well, I have comcast HD DVR which uses the RGBs. Is there someting else I can do? If you need to see manual you can find it here with free membership
http://tv.manualsonline.com/manuals/mfg/mitsubishi/mitsubishi_diamond_series_...
my tv uses this manual. Thanks before hand

Are you using desktop PC or a notebook?

If a desktop, what's the make and model of your graphics adapter? 

Thanks for responding. I have a desktop running Vista-DirectX version 10.0 and a NVidia GeForce 6150 LE
ForceWare version 175.21
Total available graphics memory-319MB
Dedicated video memory-128MB
System video memory-OMB
Shared system memory-191MB
Video BIOS version:5.51.28.50.38
IRQ:16
Bus:FPCI
I hope this is what you want.

dtslammer said:
Thanks for responding. I have a desktop running Vista-DirectX version 10.0 and a NVidia GeForce 6150 LE
ForceWare version 175.21
Total available graphics memory-319MB
Dedicated video memory-128MB
System video memory-OMB
Shared system memory-191MB
Video BIOS version:5.51.28.50.38
IRQ:16
Bus:FPCI
I hope this is what you want.

Okay, so the 6100 series is an integrated graphics solution that probably doesn't natively support a component video output. That leaves you with two options, since your TV only has one HD capable input:

1. You'll need to pick up a VGA to component video transcoder and a component video switch

2. You'll need to pick up a new (most likely AGP) graphics card that supports component video output with a bundled cable and a component video switch. 

The component video switch will let you plug both your cable box and the PC at the same time, and switch between the two. It must support HD signals.

As for the transcoder vs. graphics card, the graphics card will probably be the cheaper and more reliable solution, given that the hardware and drivers should support HDTV compliant resolutions without a lot of tinkering.

Your only other solution is to grab a new graphics card and run it 480p into one of the other component video inputs on the TV (I believe they support 480p) or get a card that supports S-Video and run it that way. 

All will be a lot of effort, but the HD solutions with the switch and new card/transcoder will also be a little pricey too. :(

I have Bose dvd player model#AV3-2-1 ll Media Center, can I hook the pc up to this instead of the tv through the component jacks on the back with the RGB to VGA cable you suggested earlier in the post?

dtslammer said:
I have Bose dvd player model#AV3-2-1 ll Media Center, can I hook the pc up to this instead of the tv through the component jacks on the back with the RGB to VGA cable you suggested earlier in the post?

Let me clarify. RGB inputs are not the same as component video. Your TV has a direct RGB input, which is unusual. With this input, you could get a cheap VGA to RGB breakout cable, plug it in, and adjust your graphics card to output something compatible (usually 480p or 720p).

If you're going to plug it in component video, you'll need a transcoder or new graphics card one way or another. You can skip the switch if your BOSE 3-2-1 component input (make sure it's an input) accepts HD signals. 

Well I looked and the only inputs are Composite-NTSC of PAL format and s-video. Looks like I'll to get a video card that supports s-video and just plug into one of the inputs on the tv. Now the timing, can you tell me how this is done because I have no idea. I really appreciate your help. Thanks before hand.

dtslammer said:
Well I looked and the only inputs are Composite-NTSC of PAL format and s-video. Looks like I'll to get a video card that supports s-video and just plug into one of the inputs on the tv. Now the timing, can you tell me how this is done because I have no idea. I really appreciate your help. Thanks before hand.

If you get a card that sports an S-Video jack, you'll enable it in the configuration screens that the new driver package will install. It's usually as simple as checking a box. S-Video is scaled from whatever the desktop resolution is set to, so you'll want to set the resolution at 800x600 or less or it will look terrible.

Before you do that though, can you give me an idea of what you want to do with the computer when hooked up to the TV? There may be other solutions that would be easier and higher quality, particularly if your goal is more multi-media focused.

Well I would like to view the computer on the tv. And watch movies from off of the internet. If there are other thing in the area of video from the internet like certains sites and recording, then I would like to do that eventually. But being able to watch movies is a what I really want. Thanks before hand

Matt Whitlock said:

LimoGuy said: I have a laptop with a VGA output and also an S-Video output, but my new TV has only HDMI Inputs and component video inputs. How can I get this to work??

I'm currently researching options for getting PCs pluged into HDMI jacks, but I haven't found one that really works well yet (unless the laptop sports an HDMI output, but not many do right now).

Thought I would check back again to see if you had come up with any solutions?

dtslammer said:
Well I would like to view the computer on the tv. And watch movies from off of the internet. If there are other thing in the area of video from the internet like certains sites and recording, then I would like to do that eventually. But being able to watch movies is a what I really want. Thanks before hand

If your main goal is media focused, there are some devices that bring Internet media directly to your television. Some are limited to particular sources (like Netflix for example), others let you bring in YouTube and others.

The only device I know of that's agnostic is SlingCatcher (at least until Boxee gets embedded), which with the SlingProjector feature, beams stuff from your PC to the SlingCatcher on your TV. It takes some hefty hardware to use Projector effectively, but it may be worth a look.

Product Page: http://www.slingmedia.com/go/slingcatcher

SlingCommunity Review: http://www.slingcommunity.com/article/30532/SlingCatcher-Hands-on-Review/

LimoGuy said:

Matt Whitlock said:

LimoGuy said: I have a laptop with a VGA output and also an S-Video output, but my new TV has only HDMI Inputs and component video inputs. How can I get this to work??

I'm currently researching options for getting PCs pluged into HDMI jacks, but I haven't found one that really works well yet (unless the laptop sports an HDMI output, but not many do right now).

Thought I would check back again to see if you had come up with any solutions?

I did catch a device called the AT-HDPiX at CES. It plugs in USB and outputs HDMI. The demo was compelling, but I'm hoping to get a hands on before it's something I can really recommend. You can see it here: http://thehdpix.com/

Hi Matt,
I need help .I have Philips TV model 21PT5409/05 which has only 1 Ext 1 Scart: CVBS in/out, RGB.How can I connect to My Dell Inspiron 1150 Laptop which has 15 point VGA output.It took me 1 hr to find out this so you can imagine that I am looking for simple solution
Thanks

Devesh said:
Hi Matt,
I need help .I have Philips TV model 21PT5409/05 which has only 1 Ext 1 Scart: CVBS in/out, RGB.How can I connect to My Dell Inspiron 1150 Laptop which has 15 point VGA output.It took me 1 hr to find out this so you can imagine that I am looking for simple solution
Thanks

Given the info you've provided about your TV and laptop, I'll make an assumption that the RGB input you've mentioned on your TV is actually component video, not RGB. (How I wish they didn't color component video jacks with Green, Red, and Blue connectors). Since the 1150 series doesn't have an S-Video port, you're limited to converting the VGA output to component video or converting it to S-video with an adapter.

That being said, you'll want to start with page 4: http://www.techlore.com/article/10061/How-To-Connect-a-Computer-To-Your-... and if that's out of the price range since you'd need a transcoder, then you may want to check out page 2:  http://www.techlore.com/article/10061/How-To-Connect-a-Computer-To-Your-...

Thanks alot "Matt". I'll explore the options that I have and Let you know once I decide what road I'm gonna take. Thanks again for all your help.

Hi there, i've got a problem... My pc has all kind of output's including DVI and HDMI, but my Sharp Tv has only 3 component input. I bought cable from DVI to Componenet, connected, but the only thing i see is hindrances and impediments... Video card sees my TV and sends signal, but signal does'nt recognizes on my TV. Do u have any clue?

Sorry, TV does have rca video input(yellow one) as well, but doesn't have s-video :(

Max0n said:
Hi there, i've got a problem... My pc has all kind of output's including DVI and HDMI, but my Sharp Tv has only 3 component input. I bought cable from DVI to Componenet, connected, but the only thing i see is hindrances and impediments... Video card sees my TV and sends signal, but signal does'nt recognizes on my TV. Do u have any clue?

First of all, you need to be positive your graphics card supports component video output through DVI. Unlike on consumer gear that outputs component video over DVI, the PC standard is RGB. Some cards do, but you'll need to pull the manual for your card.  If your graphics board doesn't support component video, you'll either need a new card or an external converter/transcoder.

If your card does support component video out, make sure it's selected as such (how you do that will depend on the card and drivers you have installed). Also, when hooking up component video, you need to make sure you're outputting a TV compatible resolution. Typically that means 480p, 720p, and 1080i for most TVs.

 

Hi,

Hi,
I have philips TV model 30pw8420/37b and want to connect this to my dell Latitude D520 laptop. I am not able to select the AV (input) options on TV Remote. Altough I extended my monitor from display settings in laptop but the TV doesn't show te desktop. Can you please guide me how to select it to extend the monitor.

Hi,

Hi,
I connected VGA cable from my Pc(Windows Vista, NVidia GeForce 7350 LE To TV (Flat screen Sony Bravia) and I have the video set up ok. Audio cable: I am using a Y adapter, one end output from headphone jack from pc and the other is split(red and white) that I input in the tv's R audio. I can's seem to be able to get the sound. I have video, no audio. I really, appreciate your help. Thanks.

Lilly said:
Hi,
I connected VGA cable from my Pc(Windows Vista, NVidia GeForce 7350 LE To TV (Flat screen Sony Bravia) and I have the video set up ok. Audio cable: I am using a Y adapter, one end output from headphone jack from pc and the other is split(red and white) that I input in the tv's R audio. I can's seem to be able to get the sound. I have video, no audio. I really, appreciate your help. Thanks.

Here's a few quick things to check:

1. Make sure the audio and video connections are going to the same input on the TV. In other words, you can't use the audio inputs for Input 3 and the video connections of input 4.

2. Make sure the volume on the TV is turned up.

3. Make sure the volume on the computer is not muted and turned up.

A good way to check audio from the notebook is to plug in a pair of headphones. If you hear sound, then you're good. All you need to do is make sure that it's properly connected to the correct input on the TV and that the TV is turned up.

Hi, Matt: Thank you very much for the tips. However,I was able to get the video ok by changing the resolution on the pc. Audio was another issue, and I actually did it without using the Y adapter cable. I switched the cable from the speaker to the headjack on the pc and got the sound ok. Is that the right way to do it. Do I really need to use this Y adapter cable anyway if it works without it. I am not a technical persona.
Appreciate your help.
Lilly

Lilly said:
Hi, Matt: Thank you very much for the tips. However,I was able to get the video ok by changing the resolution on the pc. Audio was another issue, and I actually did it without using the Y adapter cable. I switched the cable from the speaker to the headjack on the pc and got the sound ok. Is that the right way to do it. Do I really need to use this Y adapter cable anyway if it works without it. I am not a technical persona.
Appreciate your help.
Lilly

You said video was working fine, so I assumed it was.

Not knowing what kind of PC and sound hardware you have, it's tough to give precise instructions. However, if you have sound, then I'd say you've done it right. 

I don't know why you'd need a Y cable unless you want to hook up the sound from your computer into different devices (like the TV and a set of headphones at the same time). If you only want sound on the TV, all you need is a straight 1/8" to 1/8" male-male cable (if the TV has a 1/8" input for audio) or a 1/8" male to L/R RCA cable (if your TV sports red and white RCA inputs for audio).

ok i have a laptop with a few USB and a HDMI, and a old Analog tv with the video and audio left and audio right, and i cant find anybody to give me a straight answer on what i should use and nothing in the article looks like it would help me

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